Thermal Science and Engineering

ISSN: 2578-1782 (Online)

Thermal Science and Engineering is an international Open Access journal that publishes original research articles and review articles related to all areas of thermal science and engineering. This journal covers thermal biology, nanotechnology, thermal energy transport, thermodynamics, thermal medical systems, and devices.


 

Online Submissions

Registration and login are required to submit items online and to check the status of current submissions.

Already have a Username/Password for Thermal Science and Engineering?
GO TO LOGIN

Need a Username/Password?
GO TO REGISTRATION

Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.

  1. The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another journal for consideration (or an explanation has been provided in Comments to the Editor).
  2. The submission file is in OpenOffice, Microsoft Word, RTF, or WordPerfect document file format.
  3. Where available, URLs for the references have been provided.
  4. The text is single-spaced; uses a 12-point font; employs italics, rather than underlining (except with URL addresses); and all illustrations, figures, and tables are placed within the text at the appropriate points, rather than at the end.
  5. The text adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the Author Guidelines, which is found in About the Journal.
  6. If submitting to a peer-reviewed section of the journal, the instructions in Ensuring a Blind Review have been followed.
 

Privacy Statement

The names and email addresses entered in this journal site will be used exclusively for the stated purposes of this journal and will not be made available for any other purpose or to any other party.

Article Processing Charges (APC)

Thermal Science and Engineering is an Open Access Journal under EnPress Publisher. All articles published in Thermal Science and Engineering are accessible electronically from the journal website without commencing any kind of payment. In order to ensure contents are freely available and maintain publishing quality, Article Process Charges (APC) is applicable to all authors who wish to submit their articles to the journal to cover the cost incurred in processing the manuscripts. Such cost will cover the peer-review, copyediting, typesetting, publishing, content depositing and archiving processes. Those charges are applicable only to authors who have their manuscript successfully accepted after peer-review.

Journal TitleAPC
Thermal Science and Engineering$800

We encourage authors to publish their papers with us and don’t wish the cost of article processing fees to be a barrier especially to authors from the low and lower middle income countries/regions. A range of discounts or waivers are offered to authors who are unable to pay our publication processing fees. Authors can write in to apply for a waiver and requests will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

APC Payment

Payments for APC of this journal can be made through our online PayPal payment gateway. Enter the article no. into the below textbox and select "Pay Now" to proceed with payment.

Article No.*

*Article No. is mandatory for payment and it can be found on the acceptance letter issued by the Editorial Office. Payment without indicating Article No. will result in processing problem and delay in article processing. Please note that payments will be processed in USD. You can make payment through Masters, Visa or UnionPay card.

Announcements

 

Research News: Large wind and solar farms in the Sahara would increase heat, rain, vegetation

Wind and solar farms are known to have local effects on heat, humidity and other factors that may be beneficial -- or detrimental -- to the regions in which they are situated. A new climate-modeling study finds that a massive wind and solar installation in the Sahara Desert and neighboring Sahel would increase local temperature, precipitation and vegetation. Overall, the researchers report, the effects would likely benefit the region.

The study, reported in the journal Science, is among the first to model the climate effects of wind and solar installations while taking into account how vegetation responds to changes in heat and precipitation, said lead author Yan Li, a postdoctoral researcher in natural resources and environmental sciences at the University of Illinois.

Posted: 2018-09-12
 

Research News: Could a 'demon' help create a quantum computer?

Reduced entropy in a three-dimensional lattice of super-cooled, laser-trapped atoms could help speed progress toward creating quantum computers. A team of researchers at Penn State can rearrange a randomly distributed array of atoms into neatly organized blocks, thus performing the function of a "Maxwell's demon" -- a thought experiment from the 1870s that challenged the second law of thermodynamics. The organized blocks of atoms could form the basis for a quantum computer that uses uncharged atoms to encode data and perform calculations. A paper describing the research appears September 6, 2018 in the journal Nature.

"Traditional computers use transistors to encode data as bits that can be in one of two states -- zero or one," said David Weiss, professor of physics at Penn State and the leader of the research team. "We are devising quantum computers that use atoms as 'quantum bits' or 'qubits' that can encode data based on quantum mechanical phenomena that allow them to be in multiple states simultaneously. Organizing the atoms into a packed 3D grid allows us to fit a lot of atoms into a small area and makes computation easier and more efficient."

Posted: 2018-09-12
 

Research News: A new way to remove ice buildup without power or chemicals

From airplane wings to overhead powerlines to the giant blades of wind turbines, a buildup of ice can cause problems ranging from impaired performance all the way to catastrophic failure. But preventing that buildup usually requires energy-intensive heating systems or chemical sprays that are environmentally harmful. Now, MIT researchers have developed a completely passive, solar-powered way of combating ice buildup.

The system is remarkably simple, based on a three-layered material that can be applied or even sprayed onto the surfaces to be treated. It collects solar radiation, converts it to heat, and spreads that heat around so that the melting is not just confined to the areas exposed directly to the sunlight. And, once applied, it requires no further action or power source. It can even do its de-icing work at night, using artificial lighting.

Posted: 2018-09-12
 
More Announcements...

Vol 1, No 1 (In publishing)

Table of Contents

Articles

Cuihui Shen, Yamin Zhao, Yiqun Li
Pages:
View: Abstract | PDF

Articles

Jinbin Xu, Pengcheng Li, Junqi Dou
Pages:
View: Abstract | PDF

Articles

Dehong Li, Ruifang Bai, Zhangang Huo
Pages:
View: Abstract | PDF

Articles

Hongtao Meng, Jihui Tang, Haifeng Huang
Pages:
View: Abstract | PDF

Articles

Yuanming Zhao, Anna Qiu, Juexian Qi
Pages:
View: Abstract | PDF








contact us

14701 Myford Road, Suite B-1, Tustin, CA 92780, United States
Tel:+1 (949) 299 0192