Characterization and Applications of Diamond-like Nanocomposites: A Brief Review

Kalyan Adhikary, Sayan Das, Debasish De, Anup Mondal, Utpal Gangopadhyay, Sukhendu Jana

Abstract


Diamond-like Nanocomposites (DLN) is a newly member in amorphous carbon (a:C) family. It consists of two or more interpenetrated atomic scale network structure. The amorphous silicon oxide (a:SiO) is incorporated within diamond-like carbon (DLC) matrix i.e. a:CH and both the network is interpenetrated by Si-C bond. Hence, the internal stress of deposited DLN film decreases remarkably compare to DLC. The diamond like properties has come due to deform tetrahedral carbon with sp3 configuration and high ratio of sp3 to sp2 bond. The DLN has excellent mechanical, electrical, optical and tribological properties. Those the properties of DLN could be varied over a wide range by changing deposition parameters, precursor and even post deposition treatment also. The range of properties are : Resistivity 10-4 to 1014 Ωcm, hardness 10–22 GPa, coefficient of friction 0.03-0.2, wear factor 0.2-0.4 10-7mm3/Nm, transmission Vis-far IR, modulus of elasticity 150-200 GPa, residual stress 200-300 Mpa, Dielectric constant 3-9 and maximum operating temperature 6000C in oxygen environment and 12000C in O2 free air. Generally, the PECVD method is used to synthesis the DLN film. The most common procedures used for investigation of structure and composition of DLN films are Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), HRTEM, FESEM and X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS). Interest in the coating technology has been expressed by nearly every industrial segment including automotive, aerospace, chemical processing, marine, energy, personal care, office equipment, electronics, biomedical and tool and die or in a single line from data to beer in all segment of life. In this review paper, characterization of Diamond-like Nanocomposites is discussed and subsequently different application areas are also elaborated.


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Diamond-like Nanocomposites (DLN) is a newly member in amorphous carbon (a:C) family. It consists of two or more interpenetrated atomic scale network structure. The amorphous silicon oxide (a:SiO) is incorporated within diamond-like carbon (DLC) matrix i.e. a:CH and both the network is interpenetrated by Si-C bond. Hence, the internal stress of deposited DLN film decreases remarkably compare to DLC. The diamond like properties has come due to deform tetrahedral carbon with sp3 configuration and high ratio of sp3 to sp2 bond. The DLN has excellent mechanical, electrical, optical and tribological properties. Those the properties of DLN could be varied over a wide range by changing deposition parameters, precursor and even post deposition treatment also. The range of properties are : Resistivity 10-4 to 1014 Ωcm , hardness 10–22 GPa, coefficient of friction 0.03-0.2, wear factor 0.2-0.4 10-7mm3/Nm, transmission Vis-far IR, modulus of elasticity 150-200 GPa, residual stress 200-300 Mpa, Dielectric constant 3-9 and maximum operating temperature 6000C in oxygen environment and 12000C in O2 free air. Generally, the PECVD method is used to synthesis the DLN film. The most common procedures used for investigation of structure and composition of DLN films are Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), HRTEM, FESEM and X-ray photo electron spectroscopy (XPS). Interest in the coating technology has been expressed by nearly every industrial segment including automotive, aerospace, chemical processing, marine, energy, personal care, office equipment, electronics, biomedical and tool and die or in a single line from data to beer in all segment of life. In this review paper, characterization of Diamond-like Nanocomposites is discussed and subsequently different application areas are also elaborated.




DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24294/can.v2i1.554

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