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Research News: Pain response in babies' brains controlled in 'similar way to adults'

Research News: Largest brain study of 62,454 scans identifies drivers of brain aging

Research News: New method refines cell sample analysis

Researchers from the Department of Paediatrics and Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging at the University of Oxford, UK, have identified the neural network that helps control babies' brain activity in response to pain in a similar way to adults.

Their findings build on their previous study from 2015, which revealed that newborns experience pain like adults. Both papers are published in the journal eLife.

"In our previous work, we used an imaging technique called functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, or fMRI, to show that pain-related brain activity in newborn infants is similar to that observed in adults,"

Newborn baby crying.
Credit: © nasimi / Fotolia
Posted: 2018-09-12
 
In the largest known brain imaging study, scientists from Amen Clinics (Costa Mesa, CA), Google, John's Hopkins University, University of California, Los Angeles and the University of California, San Francisco evaluated 62,454 brain SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) scans of more than 30,000 individuals from 9 months old to 105 years of age to investigate factors that accelerate brain aging. SPECT tomography) evaluates regional cerebral blood flow in the brain that is reduced in various disorders.

Lead author, psychiatrist Daniel G. Amen, MD, founder of Amen Clinics, commented, "Based on one of the largest brain imaging studies ever done, we can now track common disorders and behaviors that prematurely age the brain. Better treatment of these disorders can slow or even halt the process of brain aging. The cannabis abuse finding was especially important, as our culture is starting to see marijuana as an innocuous substance. This study should give us pause about it."

Drivers of brain aging.
Credit: Daniel G. Amen
Posted: 2018-09-12
 
Researchers at the University of Zurich have developed a novel method for analyzing cells and their components called Iterative Indirect Immunofluorescence Imaging (4i). This innovation greatly refines the standard immunofluorescence imaging technique used in biomedicine and provides clinicians with an enormous amount of data from each individual sample. 4i makes it possible to observe the spatial distribution of at least 40 proteins and their modifications in the same cell for hundreds of thousands of cells simultaneously at various levels, from the tissue down to the organelle level.
4i is the first imaging technique which gives us a multiplexed tissue-to-organelle view of biological samples and links multiple information in one and the same experiment.
Credit: UZH
Posted: 2018-09-12
 
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